Paul Mampilly Shows A Better Way To Make Millions

Paul Mampilly is an investor who used to make money for hedge fund clients, but now he makes money for regular people by giving them guidance in the newsletters he writes at Banyan Hill.

Mampilly said in an interview with Ideamensch that if he could go back and do it all over again, he’d have become an investor on his own knowledge through reading and getting into it himself. Yet he did say that his education and background did allow him to learn many things that have shaped where he is now. His newsletters are “Extreme Fortunes,” “Profits Unlimited” and “True Momentum” that have generated thousands of subscribers. Most followers have given reviews about Mampilly’s advice genuinely working for them.

Paul Mampilly came to the Wall Street world after completing his education at Fordham University in New York. He learned the job as research assistant very quickly and his superiors at Deutsche Bank had him promoted to an advisory role. Mampilly earned hefty compensations from other big banks such as ING, Royal Bank of Scotland, Bankers Trust and a private Swiss bank. He went from banking to hedge fund managing at Kinetics International Fund where he made investments that brought in upwards of 26% annually. He was mentioned in publications such as Barron’s and the Wall Street Journal.

Paul Mampilly did something quite incredible in 2008 when he won a competition hosted by the Templeton Foundation. He took $50 million in funds he was granted and in the middle of the great recession turned them into an 88% profit in one year. But Mampilly went beyond that even and took investments in young companies such as Facebook and Netflix and saw heavy returns on his stocks and sold them at high prices. Mampilly decided to leave Wall Street not long after because he felt the investment banks and hedge funds were taking advantage of the middle class. So he started writing his newsletters for Banyan Hill and decided to let his followers take a look at his portfolio. Mampilly also retired to spend more time with his family and run his own schedule.